Category Archives: Andi

Amelia and Yue Chin are now alumni + Andi is PhD + Kim and Kylie are graduating

Already 3 students graduated from the GPES master’s and 2 are on the edge of graduation.

Amelia, Yue Chin and Andi all obtained their master’s degree in september 2015, respectively writing about flows of radioactive contaminants in Japanese rivers, corals’ nutrients intake, and transcription factors involved in chloroplast differentiation. Andi however extended for a PhD program.

Only last month, both Kim (PhD) and Kylie (master) submitted their thesis, and both greatly performed during their oral defence.

Kim first resumed and interlinked the contents of his three published articles, namely “Comparative analysis of environmental impact assessment (EIA) procedures of Japan and New Zealand”, “Large scale renewable energy project barriers: EIA streamlining efforts in Japan and the EU”, and finally “the determinants of wind energy shares in the United States: Drivers and Barriers”. Kim’s work provided us an in-depth understanding of legal, political and administrative burdens that might hamper renewable energy adoption in various countries, as well as how to overcome these obstacles.

Finally, Kylie elaborated an analysis of biodiversity range shifts, based on an exhaustive data set detailing the species registered at all hydraulic dams around Japan in the past 20 years. She concluded that the shifting patterns are highly variable depending on each taxon, and that the hypothesis of northwards migration due to climate change may not quite be warranted.

Congratulations guys! We thank all of you for your great contributions to GPES and hope you all the best for your professional careers!kylie-thesis

Science of Impurity & Electric Power Industry in Japan Presentations

Hello everyone,

Today I want to draw your attention towards the amazing presentations that fellow GPES member Andi presented in the cause of the “Foundations of Environmental Sciences I” class in October as well as November 2014. His presentations are summaries of book chapters, each time complemented with own additions and information.

He kindly agreed to make them available (therefore please do not reproduce or distribute without his permission) so that everyone can get and impression on both the evolution of water purity analysis in this “COUNTING THE COUNTLESS : THE TEMPTATIONS OF QUANTITATIVE BACTERIOLOGY, 1880-1890″ presentation as well being able to find a brief outline on the basic structure of the Japanese electricity in post-WWII Japan under American occupation in his “THE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY: ROAD TO SELF-RELIANCE” presentation.

Without further ado, please have a look at his great work that makes those difficult topics more accessible and comprehensible:

FI

 

I. COUNTING THE COUNTLESS : THE TEMPTATIONS OF QUANTITATIVE BACTERIOLOGY, 1880-1890

FII

II. THE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY: ROAD TO SELF-RELIANCE

Best regards,

The GPES Student Group

©2014 Andi & GPES Student Group

Odaiba Trip November 2014 – Karaoke, Food and Kim’s Birthday

Hello everyone,

At the beginning of November 2014, the GPES members went to together on an exciting trip to discover the mysteries of one Tokyo’s most renowned entertainment districts. Odaiba is an artificial island that is divided between the Koto, Shinagawa and Minato wards.

We stopped at Tokyo Teleport station to visit many of the most famous sights in Odaiba such as a huge Gundam robot figure, a small replication of the Statue of Liberty, whose original can be found in New York City. We visited the Fuji Television headquarters, which was filled with memorabilia for Japanese TV drama aficionados.

Then we went on to the main event, an extensive of one of Japanese favourite pastimes, Karaoke, which is  a form of entertainment that originated in Japan in the 1960’s and since has found success in many countries all over the world. It is basically a form of musical rendition of famous songs, in which the original voices and singing are muted and amateur singers then attempt to recreate the original singing parts as true to the original as possible.

As the we met on a national holiday, the place was already entirely occupied upon our arrival so we had to wait for approximately one hour. In the meantime, we explored another of Japan’s many peculiar attractions: UFO catchers. Although these are not limited to Japan anymore, the variations and sophistication of the machines in Japan is certainly unique, there was even a Haagen-Dazs ice cream (!!!) catcher. We tried our luck and some of us actually succeeded in catching one of these sought after stuffed creatures.

Soon thereafter we got the sign that our personal Karaoke booth was ready, so set a song playlist among a wide array of Japanese and English-language songs and just sang our hearts out.

After that, we went to Andi’s home to enjoy some the DELICIOUS Indonesian food that he did prepare. The taste was awesome and the whole dish underlined once again Andi’s star chef-like cooking skills:)

And to top off this great day, my fellow GPES friends surprised Kim with some very creative gifts (a Ted-dy bear and a lush wig to let Kim dwell in past and better times..;-);  and  an original cake in the form of a cup of Ramen noodles.

All in all it was an amazing day with great times shared among good friends. I hope you will enjoy the pictures, have a look.

Best regards,

The GPES Student Group

(Pictures ©2014 Lewis & Amelia)

GPES Soup Curry Meeting (October 2014)

IMG_8809

Hello everyone,

At the start of last October, the GPES Student Group members all gathered to go and enjoy some delicious “Soup Curry” in the Shimokitazawa in the western part of Tokyo (in the Setagaya-ward to be more precise). Soup curry is a dish that reputedly originates from Sapporo, Hokkaido, although that fact is hard to verify.

A restaurant called “Magic Spice” had built up quite a reputation for itself over time and we wanted to find out what all the talk was about. We went on a weekday, but to our surprise the place a packed and I doubt that we would’ve be able to get a seats for a 6-people party without prior reservation.

Please have a look: http://www.magicspice.net/

The decor and atmosphere are definitely unique and intriguing to say the least. This place seems to be literally “out of this world”. This theme does not halt at the menu either which surprises the irritated guest with strange spice combinations and denominations that only remotely relate to the actual ingredients contained in those spice mixes.

Anyway, thanks to the inspiring atmosphere and the fun conversations between the GPES students, this turned out to be truly great evening that was crowned with the birthday celebrations for Yue Chin and Amelia.

Best regards,

The GPES Student Group

IMG_8805

(Pictures ©2014 GPES Student Group)

Photosynthesis and its key role as a sustainable energy supply

Global warming is a complex problem which is related to manyy other environmental issues. One of the most important of these issues is the significance of energy consumption to human existence.

Energy consumption is the source of much environmental degradation, yet we are dependent on it, especially now since the populations in emerging countries are becoming more prosperous and affluent, thus there is an even higher demand for energy.

People cannot have both an increase fossil fuel use and a habitable planet at the same time. Fossil fuels such as coal, petroleum, and natural gas are our main sources of energy, producing the vast majority of fuel, electricity, and heat used by people across the world. Yet, fossil fuel-fired power plants are the largest source of global warming pollution.

They release huge quantities of green house gases to the atmosphere. To address it, we must accelerate development of clean energy, improve energy efficiency and reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. We must also find new ways to reducegreenhouse gases.

The development of renewable energy such solar energy, wind power, hydropower, geothermal energy, biofuel and biomass are important to be used to deal with these problems.

As a biologist, I think biofuel and biomass could be commercially important in the future. Related to the photosynthesis studies, I believe that genetic engineering can be used to create a high biomass-producing plant to increase crop yields of food, fiber, wood, and fuel, as well as to make better environmental condition in the future.

Herewith I enclose my presentation in Masuda-Sensei Class entitled Photosynthesis and its key role as a sustainable future energy supply.

Photosynthesis and its key role as a future

(Picture source: shutterstock.com)